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NEW HAMPSHIRE

Claremont Sch. Dist. v. Governor, 147 N.H. 499, 794 A.2d 744 (N.H. 2002) (Claremont IV).

Plaintiffs filed a motion seeking a declaration that the state’s education system remained unconstitutional in that the state had failed to adopt accountability standards. The New Hampshire Supreme Court granted the motion, ruling that “accountability is an essential component of the State's duty” and that the statutory scheme had deficiencies that were inconsistent with the duty to provide a constitutionally adequate education.

Claremont Sch. Dist. v. Governor, 144 N.H. 210, 744 A.2d 1107 (N.H. 1999) (Claremont III).

The New Hampshire Supreme Court held that the phase-in provision of the education property tax statute adopted in response to Claremont II, which effectively provided a partial exemption for property-tax rich municipalities, violated the constitutional provision requiring proportionate tax burdens among municipalities throughout the state.

Claremont Sch. Dist. v. Governor, 142 N.H. 462, 703 A.2d 1353 (N.H. 1997) (Claremont II).

The New Hampshire Supreme Court held that the state's school funding system resulted in unreasonable and disproportionate tax burdens among municipalities throughout the state in violation of the taxation provision of the state constitution.

Claremont Sch. Dist. v. Governor, 138 N.H. 183, 635 A.2d 1375 (N.H. 1993) (Claremont I).

The New Hampshire Supreme Court held that the “encouragement of literature clause” of the state constitution imposed on the state a duty to provide a “constitutionally adequate education to every educable child in the public schools in the state” and to guarantee adequate funding for such education. The Court ruled that the state had failed to satisfy this duty.